Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 66 items for :

  • "money agent" x
Clear All
Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan
This departmental paper marks the 10th anniversary of the IMF Financial Access Survey (FAS). It offers a retrospective of the FAS database, along with some reflections as to its future directions. Since its 2009 launch, the FAS has provided granular data on access to and use of financial services. It is a supply-side database with annual global coverage based on data sourced directly from financial service providers—aimed at supporting policymakers to target and evaluate financial inclusion policies. Its data collection has kept pace with financial innovation, such as the rise of mobile money and growing demand for gender-disaggregated data—and the FAS must continue to evolve.
Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

cooperatives per 100,000 adults Insurance corporations per 100,000 adults Branchless Banking Automated Teller Machines per 1,000 km² Automated Teller Machines per 100,000 adults Non-branch retail agent outlets of commercial banks per 1000 km² Non-branch retail agent outlets of commercial banks per 100,000 adults Mobile Money Registered mobile money agent outlets per 1,000 km² Registered mobile money agent outlets per 100,000 adults Active mobile money agent outlets per 1,000 km² Active mobile money agent outlets per 100,000 adults Use of

Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

Traditional Banking Services Varies across Different Income Levels Figure 9. Growing Usage of Credit Cards and Mobile and Internet Banking Figure 10. Retail Agent Outlets Are Widespread in Asia and Latin America Figure 11. Asia Has Seen a Remarkable Growth in Mobile Money Figure 12. Mobile Money Agents Are More Prevalent in Countries with Lower Access to Traditional Banking Services Figure 13. Positive Correlation between Mobile Money Access Points and an Enabling Regulatory Environment Figure 14. Wide Variation in the Financial Inclusion Gender Gap Figure 15

Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

-branch retail agent outlets), and mobile money (registered and active mobile money agent outlets). All are intended to measure access points to financial services via various modes. Larger values in these indicators suggest a higher degree of financial access. FAS indicators for usage of financial services cover a wide spectrum—from different types of financial service providers (FSPs), instruments, and users— to gender disaggregation. FAS usage indicators for commercial banks contain information on deposit and loan accounts, both for households and SMEs, including gender

Purva Khera, Miss Stephanie Y Ng, Ms. Sumiko Ogawa, and Ms. Ratna Sahay

over 2011–18) on digital financial usage index and; (ii) to avoid potential reverse causality associated with (i), we relate digital financial usage in 2011 to subsequent average growth over the period 2011–18; and (iii) to establish causality, we use a cross-country instrument variable estimator to extract the exogenous components of the digital financial usage index. For this purpose, access to mobile money agents and access to the internet are used as instrument variables to control for the simultaneity bias. Results show that the positive link between digital