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International Monetary Fund
This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic growth in Yemen slowed in 2004 owing to a sharp contraction in the oil sector. Oil production declined by 5.9 percent, reflecting diminishing recovery from aging large oil fields as well as the absence of significant new discoveries. Some progress has been made in structural reforms. The revised General Sales Tax law submitted to parliament in late 2004 included several improvements designed to protect the integrity and simplicity of this tax.
Majdi Debbich
This paper uses an untapped source of satellite-recorded nightlights and gas flaring data to characterize the contraction of economic activity in Yemen throughout the ongoing conflict that erupted in 2015. Using estimated nightlights elasticities on a sample of 72 countries for real GDP and 28 countries for oil GDP over 6 years, I derive oil and non-oil GDP growth for Yemen. I show that real GDP contracted by a cumulative 24 percent over 2015-17 against 50 percent according to official figures. I also find that the impact of the conflict has been geographically uneven with economic activity contracting more in some governorates than in others.
International Monetary Fund

This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic growth in Yemen slowed in 2004 owing to a sharp contraction in the oil sector. Oil production declined by 5.9 percent, reflecting diminishing recovery from aging large oil fields as well as the absence of significant new discoveries. Some progress has been made in structural reforms. The revised General Sales Tax law submitted to parliament in late 2004 included several improvements designed to protect the integrity and simplicity of this tax.

International Monetary Fund

This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic growth in Yemen slowed in 2004 owing to a sharp contraction in the oil sector. Oil production declined by 5.9 percent, reflecting diminishing recovery from aging large oil fields as well as the absence of significant new discoveries. Some progress has been made in structural reforms. The revised General Sales Tax law submitted to parliament in late 2004 included several improvements designed to protect the integrity and simplicity of this tax.

International Monetary Fund

This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic growth in Yemen slowed in 2004 owing to a sharp contraction in the oil sector. Oil production declined by 5.9 percent, reflecting diminishing recovery from aging large oil fields as well as the absence of significant new discoveries. Some progress has been made in structural reforms. The revised General Sales Tax law submitted to parliament in late 2004 included several improvements designed to protect the integrity and simplicity of this tax.

Majdi Debbich

Front Matter Page Middle East and Central Asia Department Contents I. Introduction II. Data III. Regressions IV. Growth In Yemen V. Conclusion Figures Figure 1. Total nightlights in Yemen (100 = TNL in March 2012) Figure 2. VIIRS composite images of Yemen Figure 3. Gas flaring on oil production sites in Yemen from Google Earth Figure 4. Radiant heat from gas flaring in Yemen (100 = RH in March 2012) Figure 5. Real GDP in PPP (constant 2011 U.S. dollars) and total nightlights intensity Figure 6. Radiant heat from gas flaring

Majdi Debbich

data allow to account for different sources of radiance including light generated from gas flaring on oil fields which together with total nightlights can be leveraged to estimate oil production ( Do et al., 2017 ). Using a sample of 72 countries from the MENAP and Caucasus and Central Asia (CCA) regions and sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) over 6 years (2012–2017), I estimate nightlights-based oil and total real GDP equations and predict non-oil GDP as the residual. I then use point estimates to characterize GDP growth in Yemen and the contributions of oil and non

International Monetary Fund

result, the overall level of poverty in 2009 was broadly similar to the level in 1998. The high rate of population growth in Yemen further complicates the poverty situation. The ratio of the population that lives below US$ 2 per day in Yemen is 47 percent compared to the MENA average of 17 percent in 2005. Poverty in Yemen (in percent of total population) 1998 2006 2009 (prel.) food/extreme overall food/extreme overall food/extreme overall Urban n.a 32.3 n.a. 20.7 17.7 29.9 Rural n.a 42.5 n

International Monetary Fund
Yemen is confronted with a range of difficult economic challenges. The reduction in oil revenues in the past year has affected the Yemeni economy through a set of direct and indirect channels. The loss of oil revenue contributed to a record fiscal deficit of about 10 percent of GDP in 2009, financed in large part by the central bank. The balance of payments was also put under considerable strain. The identified measures are home-grown and designed to have a long-lasting impact on the structure of the budget.