Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "government wage structure" x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund
This paper argues that the development of human capital in the public sector should be an important ingredient in any proposed set of “second-generation” reforms for Africa. In the post-colonial era the quality of governance has seriously declined, and the stock of human capital in the public sector has been eroded by a flight of human capital from many countries in response to compression of wages. The paper develops a simple theoretical framework to discuss these issues and the continent’s experience with foreign technical assistance in supplementing the low level of domestic human capital.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

reforms. Moving ahead with the reform of the privileged pension system in the Federation, and streamlining the government wage structure and the ministries and agencies in all of BiH will generate structural savings and create room for growth-enhancing capital investments and priority social spending. In addition, enhanced control over lower-level governments, extra-budgetary funds, and public companies, as well as steps to improve tax administration will help improve government finances. The success of these reforms will require strong political will and a careful

International Monetary Fund

the typical worker’s marginal product, but the most important is probably the government’s sincere intent to improve the well-being of its citizens through higher general wage levels. Whatever its origins, an excessively high wage structure normally sets the stage for a demand-management problem: high wages fuel aggregate consumption, just as an artificially high wage rate encourages an inappropriate substitution of capital for labor in an economy in which labor is relatively abundant. Thus, the aggregate demand problem may be due to a government wage structure that

International Monetary Fund

government employees in Qatar and the United Arab Emirates were the first such adjustments in many years. Although the government wage structure is being adjusted upward less frequently and more moderately, annual salary increments are being paid almost automatically and nonwage benefits and allowances have increased in some cases. c. Quotas on employment of nationals Quotas or targets on employment of nationals have been in existence in most GCC countries for many years, but rarely enforced until recently. In most cases, quotas specify a minimum number or ratio of

International Monetary Fund

government wage structure beyond this optimal level is associated with welfare losses . More generally, Proposition 1 implies that there is an optimal level of governance given budget or financing constraints that can be achieved by a particular level of wage compression. Simply increasing the size of G , without taking into account the impact it has on the resources it uses up can be detrimental to social well being. If the government uses up more resources than what is dictated by the optimal configuration of G , welfare suffers. For the government sector to be

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
Bosnia and Herzegovina’s (Bah) economy started to lose steam in early 2012 as growth slowed in Europe. Intensification of the euro area crisis further affected Bin's growth outlook. However, measures such as limiting the expenditure at the central government level and targeting overall general government spending by 1 percentage point of GDP in 2013 aim to improve the economy. Comprehensive reforms of rights-based benefits are also identified, which are imperative for both medium-term fiscal sustainability and improving the functioning of labor markets.
International Monetary Fund

Antilles have been under increasing strain since the mid–1980s. During 1986–91, the cause of the imbalance was external—a progressive decline in the offshore profits tax base that was not fully compensated by cuts in expenditure. From 1992 onwards, however, the triggering factor was internal. Personnel costs began to rise rapidly, owing to increases in wages, contractual obligations to the pension fund, and the number of civil servants. In addition, there was a court-mandated adjustment in the government wage structure, payments on which were to apply retroactively. Thus

International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in the Netherlands Antilles during 1990–96. The economic situation started deteriorating significantly since the early 1990s. Economic growth slackened, mainly reflecting weak investment and a sharp drop in tourist arrivals in 1995–96 owing to hurricane damage. The underlying external position deteriorated progressively, and reserves fell to an uncomfortably low level. The major factors behind the deterioration were occasional slippages in monetary policy and persistently large fiscal deficits that had their roots in a rapid growth of personnel costs.
International Monetary Fund

expenditures have been rigidly linked to the minimum wage, which has effectively prevented restructuring the government wage structure and the social safety net. Explicit budgetary subsidies amounted to nearly 5 percent of GDP, of which the larger part consisted of bread subsidies. The implicit subsidy for bread was also substantial as the Government allocated foreign exchange to the state bread company at highly preferential exchange rates to finance the importation of wheat and flour. At the same time, the Government set the domestic procurement price of wheat at an

International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in Azerbaijan during the 1990s. In 1992, approximately 70–80 percent of producer and consumer prices were liberalized, and enterprises were allowed greater latitude in their price and wage setting. However, price controls were applied on energy and bread prices, price markups remained controlled, and the price liberalization process was constrained by state procurement of major production items. Although the coverage of the state order system was gradually reduced, it still accounted for most of the production of “strategic goods” at end-1994.