Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 82 items for :

  • "employment protection law" x
Clear All
Mr. Pierre Cahuc and Stéphane Carcillo
This paper proposes an ex ante evaluation of the effects of new labor contracts such as the "Contrat Nouvelle Embauche" (CNE) introduced in France in 2005. The lessons we draw are of sufficiently general interest to be applicable to other countries or reforms of employment protection laws. Using a model that captures the characteristics of the French labor market, we simulate the effects of this reform on unemployment, employment, and welfare. We estimate that the CNE will lead to the creation of 70,000 additional jobs in the long run, but at the cost of a slight deterioration in welfare.
Mr. Pierre Cahuc and Stéphane Carcillo

This paper proposes an ex ante evaluation of the effects of new labor contracts such as the "Contrat Nouvelle Embauche" (CNE) introduced in France in 2005. The lessons we draw are of sufficiently general interest to be applicable to other countries or reforms of employment protection laws. Using a model that captures the characteristics of the French labor market, we simulate the effects of this reform on unemployment, employment, and welfare. We estimate that the CNE will lead to the creation of 70,000 additional jobs in the long run, but at the cost of a slight deterioration in welfare.

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

newly arrived immigrants get access to the labor market and become part of the labor supply. Taken together, immigration is therefore likely to result in a downward pressure on unemployment in the near future. Over time, however, unemployment could be expected to rise as newly arrived immigrants enter the labor force. Effective integration policies are key to speed up the process. Staff recommends that the employment protection law should be reviewed to ensure that exit costs do not deter firms from hiring new entrants with sufficient skills. Temporary contracts can

Emmanuel Jimenez and Mamta Murthi

that economic growth increases demand for workers of all ages, it is important that young people be able to compete on a more equal basis. In many middle-income countries, labor market regulations penalize new entrants. Policies that limit flexibility and mobility across sectors, such as overly rigid employment protection laws or excessively high minimum wages, tend to constrain young people more than others and lengthen the transition to work. Partial reforms, as in Europe, that introduce flexibility only for the young and unskilled, are unlikely to succeed because