Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for :

  • "data quality management" x
Clear All
Brian Graf

result in data outputs. It is designed to be independent of the data source, so it can be used for the description and quality assessment of processes based on surveys, censuses, administrative records, and other nonstatistical or mixed sources. While the GSBPM includes several overarching statistical processes, quality and metadata management are two of the key elements of the model. The data quality management process includes quality assessment and control mechanisms. It recognizes the importance of evaluation and feedback throughout the statistical business

International Monetary Fund
This paper presents an Update to the Data Module of the Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) for Mozambique. Despite the improvements in recent years, limitations in the coverage of most core comprehensive frameworks and indicators recommended in the General Data Dissemination System (GDDS) still exist, including the absence of a manufacturing or industrial production index and labor market indicators. In addition, data on public and publicly guaranteed external debt are not disseminated with the recommended breakdown. However, most GDDS recommendations regarding periodicity and timeliness have been met.
Mr. Segismundo Fassler, Mr. Manik L. Shrestha, and Mr. Reimund Mink
The global crisis of 2008 highlighted the need to understand financial interconnectedness among the various sectors of an economy and between them and their counterparties in the rest of the world. However, application of this kind of analysis has been hampered by the lack of adequate data. This paper sets the background for promoting internationally coordinated efforts for compiling and disseminating data on sectoral financial positions and flows on a from-whom-to-whom basis within the framework of the System of National Accounts. It draws on actual experiences in compiling these kinds of data and provides guidelines for their development in the future.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses the evaluation of technical assistance (TA) and training provided by the Statistical Department (STA) of the IMF to Peru during 1993–2011. The results showed that TA was reasonably effective, especially in the areas of government finance statistics, and responded well to the demands expressed by the Peruvian authorities. Many constraints to capacity were overcome through TA and training. The evaluation also found that the quality of TA reports, backstopping, and report management in STA were generally adequate.
International Monetary Fund
Malta weathered the global recession relatively well. Real estate prices and collateral values experienced some correction and appear to have stabilized more recently, but excess supply likely remains in segments of the market. Continued progress with structural reforms will also be important to establish high value exports and to raise productivity and employment rates. Further pension reform will help avoid age-related public spending. Measures to enhance the education system and encourage women and older workers to participate in the labor market will be important to raise employment.
International Monetary Fund
Malta’s financial sector has so far weathered the global turmoil relatively unscathed; the real economy has been decelerating since the last quarter of 2008. The staff report for Malta’s 2009 Article IV Consultation underlies economic developments and policies. The fiscal position deteriorated sharply in 2008, owing to one-offs and spending slippages. The current account deficit improved to 5½ percent of GDP. The immediate goal for fiscal policy should be to mitigate the negative spillovers on activity from the global crisis without compromising the already fragile public finances.
International Monetary Fund
This Article IV Consultation reports that Malta’s economy continues to perform well amidst considerable turbulence in the euro area. While spillovers have remained contained to date, Malta’s large financial sector and highly open economy heighten contagion and financial stability risks. The government, which has a one-seat majority in Parliament, narrowly survived a vote of no confidence. The policy challenge is to maintain growth and employment while building buffers against a highly uncertain international environment.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This staff report on Malta’s Article IV Consultation highlights economic development and policies. Risks from the large international bank sector appear contained given limited balance-sheet exposure to the Maltese economy, though continued vigilance is warranted. Regulatory changes to increase loan loss provisions, and the funding of the deposit compensation scheme would help contain risks in the domestic banking sector. The main challenges for fiscal policy are to reverse the deterioration of public finances, and to strengthen the governance framework. Additional measures are needed to ensure that the fiscal deficit falls below 3 percent of GDP in 2013 and that public debt remains on a sustainable path.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that Malta’s economy continues to weather the global crisis well. Real GDP growth has been one of the highest in the euro area since the beginning of the crisis, supported by relatively diversified exports, a recent recovery in domestic demand, and a stable banking sector. Unemployment is close to historical lows and among the lowest in the euro area. The external position is strong, and progress has been achieved in reducing the budget deficit. The macroeconomic outlook is favorable. Growth is expected to remain robust in 2015–16, supported by domestic demand. Inflation is projected to remain subdued. The current account surplus will likely persist.
International Monetary Fund
The report on Thailand’s Observance of Standards and Codes examines Data Module, response by the authorities, and detailed assessments using the data quality assessment framework. Thailand possesses a well-developed macroeconomic statistical system, with much strength that spans all of the datasets assessed in this report. The government clearly recognizes the importance of good statistics for effective decision making in all sectors of the economy, and it is well accepted at all levels of the statistics-producing agencies that quality builds trust and, thus, is a cornerstone of statistical work.