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, well focused, and greatly appreciated by participants. A summary of the findings of these visits is provided in Annex 2 . In 2000, the IMF began requesting that beneficiary authorities provide an assessment of completed JSA-funded projects. The questionnaires gauge the authorities’ views regarding the appropriateness and relevance of the assistance and the expert’s qualifications and experience. The questionnaires also cover the cooperation between the expert and counterparts, the usefulness of the advice in terms of the reform efforts, whether adequate attention

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-funded TA activities. In addition to project assessments submitted by the IMF to the Japanese authorities upon completion of each JSA-financed project, since 2000 beneficiary authorities have also provided their own project assessments through the completion of a questionnaire. The questionnaires gauge the authorities’ views regarding the appropriateness and relevance of the assistance and the expert’s qualifications and experience. The questionnaires also cover the cooperation between the expert and counterparts, the usefulness of the advice in terms of the reform

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Indonesia, the team concentrated on JSA assistance for TA in banking supervision. A summary of the findings of these visits is provided in Annex 2 . As of 2000, beneficiary authorities have been requested to provide an assessment of completed JSA-funded projects. The questionnaires gauge the authorities’ views regarding the appropriateness and relevance of the assistance and the experts’ qualifications and experience. The questionnaires also cover the cooperation between the expert and counterparts, the usefulness of the advice in terms of the reform efforts, whether

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper reports a brief description of the IMF and its activities, focusing in particular on its technical assistance activities. The report describes in detail the Japan Administered Account for Selected Fund Activities (JSA)—its objectives, size, scope and use, as well as assessments of its activities, with a focus on fiscal year 2004—and the scholarship programs that it finances. The IMF finances its technical assistance for its member countries mainly from its own budgetary resources; it also receives external financing from bilateral and multilateral partners. JSA resources can be used to cover the costs of short- and long-term technical assistance experts and those providing seminars and workshops. In addition, JSA projects in two or three countries are visited and reviewed each year by a joint Japan-IMF mission. These visits provide the Japanese authorities with a firsthand view of how JSA funding is being used in the field.

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, beneficiary authorities have been requested to provide an assessment of completed JSA-funded projects. The questionnaires gauge the authorities’ views regarding the appropriateness and relevance of the assistance and the expert’s qualifications and experience. The questionnaires also cover the cooperation between the expert and counterparts, the usefulness of the advice in terms of the reform efforts, whether adequate attention was paid to skills transfer, and the quality of supervision by IMF headquarters. In order to measure the overall satisfaction of the authorities

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committed to real sector statistics, 22 percent to monetary and financial statistics, and 20 percent to balance of payments and external sector statistics. In the legal area, 58 percent was committed to technical assistance for AML/ CFT, and 42 percent to work on tax legislation. Effectiveness of JSA-funded technical assistance Several measures are taken to gauge the effectiveness of JSA-funded TA activities. In addition to project assessments submitted by the IMF to the Japanese authorities upon completion of each JSA-financed project, beneficiary authorities

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.1 0 Total 108.1 16.4 16.7 17.3 18.2 17.4 18.8 20.7 13.3 247.1 100 14.8 100 Figure 5 . Distribution of JSA Technical Assistance Commitments by Subject Area, FY2009 Effectiveness of JSA-funded technical assistance Several approaches are used to gauge the quality and effectiveness of JSA-funded TA activities. In addition to project assessments submitted by the IMF to the Japanese authorities upon completion of each JSA-financed project, since FY2000 beneficiary authorities have also provided their own project

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, the Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland—were launched in July 2016 to ensure sustained support for countries in strengthening tax capacity and effectively mobilizing natural resource wealth. The Data for Decisions Fund (D4D) was endorsed by IMF management in March 2017 and will improve the quality, coverage, timeliness, and dissemination of macroeconomic statistics of beneficiary authorities. The D4D Fund will also sustain the Financial Access Survey, portions of which are used to measure UN SDG indicators. ▪ In support of the objective that financial

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carried out in FY2002 is provided in Annex 2 . Starting in calendar year 2000, beneficiary authorities of all completed JSA-funded projects are requested to provide an assessment of their projects. Completed evaluation questionnaires received to date from these authorities have overall been very positive. Scholarship Programs Japan-IMF Scholarship Program for Asia The Japan-IMF Scholarship Program for Asia is a program for graduate studies in macroeconomics or related fields at various universities in Japan. The Program is aimed at promising, young

Mr. Koshy Mathai, Mr. Christoph Duenwald, Ms. Anastasia Guscina, Rayah Al-Farah, Mr. Hatim Bukhari, Mr. Atif Chaudry, Moataz El-Said, Fozan Fareed, Mrs. Kerstin Gerling, Nghia-Piotr Le, Mr. Franto Ricka, Mr. Cesar Serra, Tetyana Sydorenko, Mr. Sébastien Walker, and Mr. Mohammed Zaher

the overall health sector. Around 30 percent of the package is reserved for unemployment benefits, and 16 percent for transfers to poor households. Armenia The government announced multiple support packages directly targeted at social spending including (1) Educational support, (2) Cash transfers to families who lost their jobs, and vulnerable households (the unemployed, pregnant women, families with children), (3) Utility support, and (4) additional social security support for existing beneficiaries. Authorities timely allocated $37.2 million to as many as