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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

In 1990, Japan agreed to provide financial support for IMF technical assistance (TA) to its member countries to strengthen their capacity to formulate, implement, and maintain macro-economic and structural adjustment programs. Since then, Japan has continued to be the largest single contributor to the IMF’s technical assistance and training activities. Japan’s contributions are provided through the Japan Administered Account for Selected Fund Activities (JSA).1 In addition, Japan finances two scholarship programs—one under the JSA and another under a separate subaccount.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper reports a brief description of the IMF and its activities, focusing in particular on its technical assistance activities. The report describes in detail the Japan Administered Account for Selected Fund Activities (JSA)—its objectives, size, scope and use, as well as assessments of its activities, with a focus on fiscal year 2004—and the scholarship programs that it finances. The IMF finances its technical assistance for its member countries mainly from its own budgetary resources; it also receives external financing from bilateral and multilateral partners. JSA resources can be used to cover the costs of short- and long-term technical assistance experts and those providing seminars and workshops. In addition, JSA projects in two or three countries are visited and reviewed each year by a joint Japan-IMF mission. These visits provide the Japanese authorities with a firsthand view of how JSA funding is being used in the field.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

In 1990, Japan agreed to provide financial support for the IMF’s technical assistance to its member countries to strengthen their capacity to formulate, implement, and maintain macroeconomic and structural adjustment programs. Since then, Japan has been, and continues to be, the largest contributor to the IMF’s technical assistance (TA) activities.1 Japan’s contributions are provided through the “Japan Administered Account for Selected Fund Activities” (JSA).2 In addition, Japan also finances two scholarship programs, one under the JSA and the other under a separate account, the “Subaccount for Japan Advanced Scholarship Program.”

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This paper provides a brief description of the IMF and its activities, focusing in particular on its technical assistance (TA) activities. The report then describes in greater detail the Japan Administered Account for Selected Fund Activities (JSA)—including its scope and objectives, the size and uses of the TA contribution, and assessments of its TA activities and scholarship programs—with a focus on fiscal year (FY) 2009. Japan has provided grant contributions to support IMF technical assistance to member countries since 1990. In 1997, the scope of the administered account was widened to allow for financing other IMF activities in Asia and the Pacific, carried out through the IMF Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific in Tokyo. Regular consultations are held between the IMF and the Japanese authorities; the most recent formal meeting took place in April 2009. The use of JSA resources is flexible. JSA funds can be used to cover the cost of short- and long-term TA experts and other costs associated with conducting seminars and workshops, such as room rental fees.

International Monetary Fund

experts and payment of invoices, there is a time lag between commitments and disbursements. The duration of a JSA-funded TA project is normally 6 to 12 months. 11 This represents a 36 percent decrease in the amount approved and a 30 percent decrease in the number of projects funded compared with FY2007, resulting from the sharp reduction in Japan’s contribution to the JSA for FY2008 (see Table 1 ). 12 The IMF arranges for an annual audit of the JSA to be undertaken by its external auditors in connection with the annual audit of the IMF’s own accounts, and

International Monetary Fund

,448 Payments to and on behalf of beneficiaries (19,384) (20,111) (1,428) (1,743) Net changes in resources 5,879 (4,274) 90 (204) Balance, end of the year 20,459 14,580 1,924 1,834 Note: The IMF arranges for an annual audit of the JSA to be undertaken by its external auditors, in connection with their annual audit of the IMF’s own accounts, and for a separate certificate of completion to be provided to the Japanese authorities.