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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
La edición en Internet del Boletín del FMI, que se actualiza varias veces a la semana, contiene numerosos artículos sobre temas de actualidad en el ámbito de las políticas y la economía. Consulte las últimas investigaciones del FMI, lea entrevistas y escuche podcasts de los principales economistas del FMI sobre importantes temas relacionados con la economía mundial. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/home.aspx
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
L’édition web du Bulletin du FMI est mise à jour plusieurs fois par semaine et contient de nombreux articles sur des questions de politique générale et de politique économique d'actualité. Accédez aux dernières recherches du FMI, lisez des interviews et écoutez des podcasts proposés par les principaux économistes du FMI sur des questions importantes de l'économie mondiale. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/home.aspx
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
The Web edition of the IMF Survey is updated several times a week, and contains a wealth of articles about topical policy and economic issues in the news. Access the latest IMF research, read interviews, and listen to podcasts given by top IMF economists on important issues in the global economy. www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/home.aspx
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

The SDR interest rate and the rate of remuneration are equal to a weighted average of interest rates on specified short-term domestic obligations in the money markets of the five countries whose currencies constitute the SDR valuation basket. The rate of remuneration is the rate of return on members’ remunerated reserve tranche positions. The rate of charge, a proportion of the SDR interest rate, is the cost of using the IMF’s financial resources. All three rates are computed each Friday for the following week. The basic rates of remuneration and charge are further adjusted to reflect burden-sharing arrangements. For the latest rates, call (202) 623-7171 or check the IMF website (http://0-www-imf-org.library.svsu.edu/cgi-shl/bur.pl?2004).

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

No 231: “Chile: Institutions and Policies Underpinning Stability and Growth,” Eliot Kalter, Steven Phillips, Marco A. Espinosa-Vega, Rodolfo Luzio, Mauricio Villafuerte, and Manmohan Singh

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

On current trends, most developing countries will fail to meet most of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), according to the Global Monitoring Report 2004, which was publicly launched on July 7. It is the first in a series of annual World Bank-IMF reports on the progress being made to achieve the MDGs. Zia Qureshi, lead author and a senior advisor in the World Bank’s Global Monitoring Secretariat, and James Boughton, co-author and an assistant director in the IMF’s Policy Development and Review Department, reviewed the findings. Commentary was provided by Moisés Nairn, editor of Foreign Policy and former World Bank Executive Director; Gene Sperling, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations ; and Ian Goldin, Vice President of External and UN Affairs at the World Bank.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Over the past 15 years, central banks have made enormous progress on the monetary policy front. But on the financial stability side, much remain: to be done, according to Professor Charles Goodhart of the London School of Economics and formerly of the Bank of England. Presenting a Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture in Zurich, Switzerland, on June 27, to an audience mainly of governors and other central bank officials attending the Annual Meeting of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), he argued that central banks will need to take some new directions if they are to make comparable progress on financial stability.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Workers’ remittances are playing an increasingly vital role in developing countries. The volume of these flows can, for example, significantly affect the liquidity of banking systems, influence monetary and exchange rate policies, and bolster external positions. To better understand their impact on developing country economies, the IMF is taking a closer look at remittances. One such study, by Jacques Bougha-Hagbe of the IMF’s Middle East and Central Asia Department, examined the determinants and long-term prospects of remittances to Morocco.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Members drawing on the IMF “purchase” other members’ currencies, or SDRs, with an equivalent amount of their own currency.