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International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

This paper presents the Supplement on international reserves, the sixth in the series of supplements to International Financial Statistics (IFS) that comprises textual material commencing with an historical perspective of international reserves. This is followed by a discussion on the methodology covering the concepts underlying the reserves data in IFS: the data collection and presentation procedures; the related data in the money and banking, and balance-of-payments sections in IFS; and a summary of the national concepts of reserves. Statistics on international reserves are important indicators of the external economic performance of countries. A country's holdings of international reserves represent its ability to meet balance of payments needs through official financial settlements. The establishment of the IMF led to the creation of a reserve asset in the form of a gold tranche position reflecting a member's subscription to the IMF in gold. To the extent that the IMF made use of a member's currency in drawings of other countries, a creation of new reserves was involved.

International Monetary Fund

.4 470.8 498.3 … (In millions of U.S. dollars) Value, f.o.b. 377.7 419.6 358.0 372.0 211.7 European Union 365.9 377.2 314.3 320.7 206.5 United States 2.0 13.0 10.6 9.5 3.8 World market 1.7 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.4 Special Preferential Sugar Agreement 2/ 8.1 27.2 31.0 40.2 … (Mauritian rupees per U.S. dollars) Conversion factor 18.708 20.417 22.635 23.993 25.186 Sources: Mauritius Sugar Syndicate (MSS); and Bank of Mauritius. 1/ Fiscal

International Monetary Fund
This report provides details of the IMF”s projections and estimates for Mauritius on GDP at constant 1992 prices and at current prices by industrial origin; expenditure on GDP at constant 1992 and at current prices; sugar cultivation, yields, and output; electricity production and consumption; estimated labor force and employment, 1996–2000; summary of government finances; revenue and grants, budgetary central government; balance of payments; financing of central government deficits during 1995/96–1999/2000; summary accounts of the Bank of Mauritius and commercial banks, 1996–2000; summary of the tax system, 2000, and so on.
International Monetary Fund

. dollars) Conversion factor 22.595 24.819 25.512 27.591 30.095 Sources: Mauritius Sugar Syndicate (MSS); and Bank of Mauritius. 1/ Fiscal year from July to June. Data differ somewhat from those presented by the MSS on a crop-year basis, which refer to disposal of a given year’s crop (from June when harvest starts to the following June). 2/ The Special Preferential Sugar Agreement was signed on June 1, 1995 between Atlantic, Caribbean, and Pacific (ACP) sugar-supplying countries and the European Union to compensate for the European

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix analyzes the labor market of Mauritius. It highlights that the high level of youth unemployment in Mauritius points to deficiencies in education and training. There are also significant rigidities in the functioning of the labor market that aggravate the problem. In particular, the Mauritian labor market is highly regulated and the relevant institutions operate according to a legalistic approach in which economic criteria play a relatively minor role.
International Monetary Fund

13.0 10.6 9.5 3.8 3.2 World market 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.4 2.1 Special Preferential Sugar Agreement 2/ 27.2 31.0 40.2 … 5.3 (Mauritian rupees per U.S.dollars) Conversion factor 19.098 22.595 24.819 25.512 27.591 Sources: Mauritius Sugar Syndicate (MSS);and Bank of Mauritius. 1/ Fiscal year from July to June. Data differ somewhat from those presented by the MSS on a crop-year basis, which refer to disposal of a given year’s crop (from June when harvest starts to the following June). 2

International Monetary Fund

.0 2.1 Special Preferential Sugar Agreement … … 7.6 25.5 31.0 (Mauritian rupees per U.S. dollars) Conversion factor 18.428 17.798 18.708 20.417 22.635 Sources: Mauritius Sugar Syndicate (MSS); and Bank of Mauritius. 1/ Fiscal year from July to June. Data differ somewhat from those presented by the MSS on a crop-year basis, which refer to disposal of a given year’s crop (from June when harvest starts to the following June). 2/ The Special Preferential Sugar Agreement was signed on June 1,1995 between

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix discusses initial performance and other issues relating to the implementation of the value-added tax in Mauritius in 1998. The paper highlights that as the Mauritius economy has continued to expand at a relatively rapid pace, the need for the monetary authorities to enhance their ability to influence domestic liquidity, as well as to ensure the integrity of the banking system, has become increasingly apparent. The paper also analyzes various issues in the banking sector of Mauritius.
International Monetary Fund

of U.S. dollars) Value, f.o.b. 372.0 211.7 263.0 287.3 290.2 European Union 320.7 206.5 252.5 257.1 276.2 United States 9.5 3.8 3.2 8.8 1.1 World market 1.7 1.4 2.1 2.3 2.5 Special Preferential Sugar Agreement 2/ 40.2 ... 5.3 19.1 10.5 (Mauritian rupees per U.S. dollars) Conversion factor 24.819 25.512 27.591 30.095 28.500 Sources: Mauritius Sugar Syndicate (MSS); and Bank of Mauritius. 1/ Fiscal year from July to June. Data differ

International Monetary Fund
The review outlines a simple analytical model to explain the unemployment puzzle, especially the U-curve phenomenon. It analyzes the central institutional imperfections that characterize the existing Mauritian labor market and suggests possible reforms. It also reviews the IMF’s projections and estimates on consolidated monetary survey, summary accounts of the Bank of Mauritius, commercial banks and offshore banks, balance of payments, summary of the tax systems and government finances, sugar cultivation, yields and output, real growth rates of expenditure on gross domestic product, gross domestic product real growth rates by industrial origin and at current prices, 1998–2002, and so on.