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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Per Jacobsson Lecture O ver the past 15 years, central banks have made enormous progress on the monetary policy front. But on the financial stability side, much remain: to be done, according to Professor Charles Goodhart of the London School of Economics and formerly of the Bank of England. Presenting a Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture in Zurich, Switzerland, on June 27, to an audience mainly of governors and other central bank officials attending the Annual Meeting of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), he argued that central banks will need to

Knight Malcolm

Malcolm Knight Ladies and gentlemen, let me welcome all of you to a key event of this weekend, the Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture to be delivered this morning by our distinguished speaker, Professor Mario Monti. It is a great honor that we have been permitted to hold this lecture and panel discussion here in the splendid setting of the National Council Chamber of the Swiss Parliament. Just to dispel any misunderstanding: the temporary fences behind which we left our buses have not been placed there for reasons of security. They are there because this

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Is there a single currency in Asia’s near future? Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Singapore’s Minister for Education and Second Minister for Finance, weighed the prospects for Asian monetary integration in the September 17 Per Jacobsson Foundation lecture and concluded that continuing evolution toward managed floats with inflation targeting, rather than pursuit of the European model, is likely to hold the answer for Asia. Shanmugaratnam first took stock of trade and financial integration in the region, where intraregional trade already constitutes 50 percent of

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

L awrence H. Summers, president of Harvard University and former U.S. Treasury Secretary, delivered the annual Per Jacobsson Foundation lecture on October 3 at the Organization of American States, with reflections on the U.S. current account deficit and the global economy. Summers called for increased national saving in the United States and for further adjustment of the exchange rate against the dollar—particularly through greater flexibility of the exchange rates of key Asian currencies—to reduce the sizable and growing U.S. current account deficit

Mr. Mario Monti

Mario Monti Ladies and gentlemen, Governors, I should first say, I am deeply grateful to the Per Jacobsson Foundation and to the BIS for providing me with this opportunity. I am honored to have been invited to deliver this Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture, and by the presence of so many distinguished guests. It is, of course, a special privilege to take the floor in this Na-tionalrat at the heart of the Swiss Confederation, which has been working smoothly as a Confederation for the last 715 years, which is a bit longer than most of our own home countries

Mr. Andrew Crockett

Delegates, honored guests, ladies and gentlemen, it is my pleasure, on behalf of the Per Jacobsson Foundation, to welcome you to this Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture. Over the past 40 years or so, this lecture has become a fixture of the Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and we have been privileged to have a very distinguished range of speakers. Per Jacobsson, as many of you know, was the third Managing Director of the IMF and, prior to that, the Chief Economist of the BIS. He was a very distinguished member of a long line

Tharman Shanmugaratnam

Delegates, honored guests, ladies and gentlemen, it is my pleasure, on behalf of the Per Jacobsson Foundation, to welcome you to this Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture. Over the past 40 years or so, this lecture has become a fixture of the Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and we have been privileged to have a very distinguished range of speakers. Per Jacobsson, as many of you know, was the third Managing Director of the IMF and, prior to that, the Chief Economist of the BIS. He was a very distinguished member of a long line

International Monetary Fund. Communications Department

It is a great honor to deliver the Per Jacobsson Foundation Lecture, and I thank the organizers for inviting me. Per Jacobsson, a Swede, was the third Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), serving from 1956 to 1963. During his tenure, the Fund supported the return to convertibility of the major European currencies, increased its resources by securing the General Arrangements to Borrow, and established the Compensatory Financing Facility to help member countries cope with temporary fluctuations in international payments. It is a