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International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix analyzes poverty and social development in Uganda. The paper reviews recent poverty and inequality trends, examines how poor people are coping with risk and vulnerability, analyzes the relationship between economic growth, structural reform and poverty, and describes the government policies in these areas. The paper also provides a brief overview of major institutional developments in Uganda’s financial sector since 1993 with regard to the legal, accounting, and general regulatory framework in which financial institutions operate.
International Monetary Fund

10 percent of GDP at end-1998/99, is not factored into the analysis. In addition, the stock of public enterprise sector debt needs to be interpreted carefully as the PEs are estimated to have positive net worth and the government, as owner of the PEs, could actually be viewed as owning equity equivalent to PE net worth. 2 In the other direction, any contingent liabilities of the public sector are also excluded from the debt stock, but these, with the exception of those associated with financial sector restructuring (most of which are already incorporated into the

International Monetary Fund

permitting a preliminary assessment of the possible financial savings from public enterprise reforms. A. Definition of Net Subsidies 79. Net subsidies to PEs are subsidies from the government to PEs net of subsidies to the government from PEs. The subsidies from the government to PEs are of two types: direct and indirect. Direct subsidies include cash equity injections from the government, donor grants, and asset transfers. Indirect subsidies include equity support, favorable financing terms, favorable fiscal terms, and others. Equity support is used to absorb PEs

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper assesses the extent to which accounting for losses of pubic enterprises (PEs), fiscal risks of public-private partnerships (PPPs), and government support to private enterprises would change Senegal’s fiscal deficit. It analyzes SENELEC’s (electricity company) financial position, and discusses the potential risks that PPPs can pose in Senegal. It examines export competitiveness and the exchange rate in Senegal. The paper also documents the performance of the export sector in Senegal, and assesses the reasons for the lackluster performance of the export sector.
International Monetary Fund

contingent liabilities from loss-making PEs, PPPs, and government guarantees could amount to 10½-11 percent of GDP in 2007 and accounting for fiscal risks could raise the fiscal deficit by about 2 percent of GDP ( Table 1 ). 2 Table 1. Fiscal risks from the operations of SOEs, PPPs, and government guarantees (in percent of GDP) 2007 Fiscal deficit 2.5 PEsnet operating losses 1 / 0.3 Airport PPP 0.5 Restructuring of ICS 1.3 Reconstitution of SAR’s capital 0.4 2 / Stock of

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues report on Thailand discusses the rapid growth years of the country before and after the 1997 balance-of-payments crisis. The report discusses development of the crisis and the steps taken to normalize the situation; credit growth before and after the crisis; public debt dynamics in the aftermath of the crisis; export performance before and after the crisis; and an analysis of the role of fiscal policy that led to the 1997 crisis. The report also highlights weaknesses that were threatening the sustainability of Thailand's economic growth.