Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 37 items for :

  • "Nighttime lights" x
Clear All
Yingyao Hu and Jiaxiong Yao
This paper seeks to illuminate the uncertainty in official GDP per capita measures using auxiliary data. Using satellite-recorded nighttime lights as an additional measurement of true GDP per capita, we provide a statistical framework, in which the error in official GDP per capita may depend on the country’s statistical capacity and the relationship between nighttime lights and true GDP per capita can be nonlinear and vary with geographic location. This paper uses recently developed results for measurement error models to identify and estimate the nonlinear relationship between nighttime lights and true GDP per capita and the nonparametric distribution of errors in official GDP per capita data. We then construct more precise and robust measures of GDP per capita using nighttime lights, official national accounts data, statistical capacity, and geographic locations. We find that GDP per capita measures are less precise for middle and low income countries and nighttime lights can play a bigger role in improving such measures.
Robert C. M. Beyer, Yingyao Hu, and Jiaxiong Yao

economic literature may be the difficulty of converting changes in nighttime light intensity into changes in economic activity. To the best of our knowledge, no properly estimated and widely accepted quarterly elasticity between VIIRS nighttime lights and economic activity exists to date. 3 In this paper, we attempt to fill this gap. VIIRS nighttime light data are an imprecise measure of man-made lights. Even after aggregating the data to the country level and to quarterly frequency, substantial statistical noise remains. It mainly stems from atmospheric conditions

Robert C. M. Beyer, Yingyao Hu, and Jiaxiong Yao
This paper presents a novel framework to estimate the elasticity between nighttime lights and quarterly economic activity. The relationship is identified by accounting for varying degrees of measurement errors in nighttime light data across countries. The estimated elasticity is 1.55 for emerging markets and developing economies, ranging from 1.36 to 1.81 across country groups and robust to different model specifications. The paper uses a light-adjusted measure of quarterly economic activity to show that higher levels of development, statistical capacity, and voice and accountability are associated with more precise national accounts data. The elasticity allows quantification of subnational economic impacts. During the COVID-19 pandemic, regions with higher levels of development and population density experienced larger declines in economic activity.
Mr. Futoshi Narita and Rujun Yin
Timely data availability is a long-standing challenge in policy-making and analysis for low-income developing countries. This paper explores the use of Google Trends’ data to narrow such information gaps and finds that online search frequencies about a country significantly correlate with macroeconomic variables (e.g., real GDP, inflation, capital flows), conditional on other covariates. The correlation with real GDP is stronger than that of nighttime lights, whereas the opposite is found for emerging market economies. The search frequencies also improve out-of-sample forecasting performance albeit slightly, demonstrating their potential to facilitate timely assessments of economic conditions in low-income developing countries.
Yingyao Hu and Jiaxiong Yao

and middle income countries where the data collection and compilation process is less sophisticated. Understanding the uncertainty of these measures and constructing more accurate measures are therefore of great importance to assess economic performance, facilitate crosscountry comparisons, and inform policy decisions. This paper attempts to use satellite-recorded nighttime lights to illuminate the uncertainty of official measures of real GDP. Mostly generated by human activity, nighttime lights are visible from outer space and recorded by satellites. They have

Robert C. M. Beyer, Yingyao Hu, and Jiaxiong Yao

management. ABSTRACT : This paper presents a novel framework to estimate the elasticity between nighttime lights and quarterly economic activity. The relationship is identified by accounting for varying degrees of measurement errors in nighttime light data across countries. The estimated elasticity is 1.55 for emerging markets and developing economies, ranging from 1.36 to 1.81 across country groups and robust to different model specifications. The paper uses a light-adjusted measure of quarterly economic activity to show that higher levels of development, statistical

Mr. Futoshi Narita and Rujun Yin

). The lack of reliable and timely information hampers real-time assessment of economic conditions and restricts the ability to set sound policies. Nontraditional data sources—so-called big data—have proven to be useful in providing operationally valuable information in LIDCs. 2 Satellite imagery data, such as nighttime lights, are used to measure economic growth and poverty in countries and sub-regions where data are scarce ( Henderson, Storeygard, and Weil, 2012 ; Jean and others, 2016 ; Engstrom, Hersh, and Newhouse, 2017 ). In Kenya, researchers analyze mobile

Yingyao Hu and Jiaxiong Yao