Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "Mauritian firm" x
Clear All
Charles Amo Yartey

, Glen and Singh (2003) find that liabilities accounted for 61 percent of total financing for the period 1996 to 2000. Retained earnings and external equity financed 21 and 18 percent respectively of total assets growth ( Table 13 ). In Mauritius, Lallchand (2001) finds that quoted Mauritian firms rely more on external finance to finance assets growth. In particular, external finance accounted for about 70 percent of total growth for the period 1992 to 1999. Table 13. Emerging Markets: Change in Total Assets, by Source of Financing, 1995

Charles Amo Yartey
This paper examines the corporate financing pattern in Ghana. In particular, it investigates whether Singh's theoretically anomalous findings that developing country firms make considerably more use of external finance and new equity issues than developed country firms to finance asset growth hold in the case of Ghana. Replicating Singh's methodology, our results show that compared with corporations in advanced countries, the average listed Ghanaian firm finances its growth of total assets mainly from short-term debt. The stock market, however, is the most important source of long-term finance for listed Ghanaian firms. Overall, the evidence in this paper suggests that the stock market is a surprisingly important source of finance for funding corporate growth and that stock market development in Ghana has been important.
International Monetary Fund

Mauritian firms being able to take advantage of their know-how and their commercial networks to maintain their presence on the world markets. Thus, below we only attempt to quantify the impact of expanded quota growth rates. The methodology consists of estimating the effect of the ATC on exports from constrained suppliers, on the one hand, and the effect on total imports into the importing country, on the other hand, and then determining the effect on unconstrained suppliers like Mauritius as a residual, eventually making rough assumptions on the relative

International Monetary Fund

has been the case over the last two decades ( Figure 3 ) . In particular, the loss of preferential access would likely reduce domestic savings, thus limiting domestic investment. Furthermore, given rising labor costs, Mauritian firms have been increasingly relocating to low-cost countries, such as Madagascar, with the result that domestic investment growth rates have been negative in the last few years. Also, foreign direct investment is almost nonexistent, partly owing to these rising labor costs. In addition, growth through further significant capital accumulation

International Monetary Fund
The Mauritian economy showed strong performance owing to its sound macroeconomic policies. Executive Directors emphasized the need to remain competitive and address the growing unemployment problem. They commended the efforts to support the developments in financial services, free port activities, and information and communications technology. They appreciated the tightening of the monetary policy and stressed the need to strengthen the financial position and ensure fiscal sustainability. They welcomed the assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of the IMF, which provided technical assistance to Mauritius.
International Monetary Fund
This Background Paper and Statistical Annex examines selected issues pertaining to the Mauritian economy, which are all related to the question of how Mauritius will be able in the future to sustain its export-led development and diversify its economy. The paper discusses the impact of the Uruguay Round agreement on the Mauritian economy. The paper also utilizes available data to assess Mauritius’s external competitiveness, which is a major issue as regards the sustainability of high export growth.
International Monetary Fund

critical to achieving high rates of growth. 43. The impending loss of trade preferences in sugar and textiles poses significant medium-term downside risks and heightens the need for rapid adjustment to the changing global environment. While some subsectors in the textile industry are likely to grow—where Mauritian firms remain competitive—other subsectors could suffer significant output and employment losses. Against this background, the country faces the challenge of significantly reducing costs and improving competitiveness. 44. The authorities are fully

International Monetary Fund
This 2004 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP growth of Mauritius is expected to rebound to about 4½ percent in 2003/04. This largely reflects the recovery of tourism and sugar production, and continued strong construction and transportation activity. The current account is projected to remain in surplus with the recovery of the tourism sector offsetting a widening in the trade deficit. The capital and financial account is projected to register a small deficit of 0.8 percent of GDP in 2003/04 compared with a surplus in 2002/03.
International Monetary Fund

-free entry for all imported goods. The government of Mozambique has also put in place import barriers to protect local sugar production from foreign competition. About 35 percent of the investment costs (some US$30 million) is being financed through equity from Mauritius and the remaining 65 percent (about US$55 million) through loans. Of the latter, Mauritian banks are providing about 30 percent, with the balance being financed by foreign banks, including the European Investment Bank. 47. Another major foreign investment in agriculture is being studied by a Mauritian