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International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.

Introduction At the request of the Honduran Ministry of Finance (SEFIN), a mission from the IMF Fiscal Affairs Department visited Tegucigalpa, Honduras from October 22 to November 5, 2018, to conduct a fiscal transparency evaluation under the first three pillars of the IMF Fiscal Transparency Code. The mission team consisted of Ramón Hurtado (mission chief), Concha Verdugo (FAD), Mariana Sabatés (STA), and Marta Morano and Natalia Salazar (FAD experts). Mr. Jean-Baptiste Gros, long-term resident expert from the IMF Central America- Panama-Dominican Republic

International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This report assesses fiscal transparency practices in Brazil in relation to the requirements of the IMF Fiscal Transparency Code. Brazil’s practices meet many of the principles of the code at good or advanced levels. Fiscal statistics encompass the general government sector and recognize most of its assets and liabilities. Fiscal reports are published frequently and in a timely manner, and annual financial statements are audited by the Federal Court of Accounts. The transparency of fiscal forecasting and budgeting benefits in some areas from good or advanced practices. The institutional scope of budget documentation is comprehensive, and the key sequences of the budget process are timely.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This report evaluates Honduras’s fiscal transparency practices in relation to the IMF Fiscal Transparency Code (FTC). Honduras’s score is similar to those of other Latin American countries and emerging market economies that have undergone the evaluation. In relation to the fiscal transparency principles, Honduran practices are considered basic in 15 areas; good in seven areas; and advanced in six areas. Fiscal transparency practices in the area of fiscal forecasting and budgeting are the strongest, while the fiscal risk analysis and management practices are the weakest. Finally, Honduras’s current fiscal transparency practices fall short of the FTC principles in eight areas.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This report evaluates Honduras’s fiscal transparency practices in relation to the IMF Fiscal Transparency Code (FTC). Honduras’s score is similar to those of other Latin American countries and emerging market economies that have undergone the evaluation. In relation to the fiscal transparency principles, Honduran practices are considered basic in 15 areas; good in seven areas; and advanced in six areas. Fiscal transparency practices in the area of fiscal forecasting and budgeting are the strongest, while the fiscal risk analysis and management practices are the weakest. Finally, Honduras’s current fiscal transparency practices fall short of the FTC principles in eight areas.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.

This report assesses fiscal transparency practices in Brazil in relation to the requirements of the IMF Fiscal Transparency Code. Brazil’s practices meet many of the principles of the code at good or advanced levels. Fiscal statistics encompass the general government sector and recognize most of its assets and liabilities. Fiscal reports are published frequently and in a timely manner, and annual financial statements are audited by the Federal Court of Accounts. The transparency of fiscal forecasting and budgeting benefits in some areas from good or advanced practices. The institutional scope of budget documentation is comprehensive, and the key sequences of the budget process are timely.