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International Monetary Fund
This paper seeks Board approval of a phased migration strategy for implementing the GFSM 2001 as the standard for Fund fiscal data. The financial crisis has underscored the need for better and more comparable fiscal data, including on government assets and liabilities. In 2005, the Board endorsed the Government Finance Statistics Manual 2001 (GFSM 2001) and asked staff to propose a migration strategy for the Fund, based on lessons to be drawn from conducting pilot studies. The pilot studies and other tests confirmed that some aspects of the GFSM 2001 methodology (primarily relating to presentation) can be implemented by staff with relatively modest resource needs, while other aspects can proceed meaningfully only after member countries have made sufficient progress in their own fiscal reporting—including in detailed balance sheet breakdowns, and in strengthening underlying accounting systems.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
Bosnia and Herzegovina’s (Bah) economy started to lose steam in early 2012 as growth slowed in Europe. Intensification of the euro area crisis further affected Bin's growth outlook. However, measures such as limiting the expenditure at the central government level and targeting overall general government spending by 1 percentage point of GDP in 2013 aim to improve the economy. Comprehensive reforms of rights-based benefits are also identified, which are imperative for both medium-term fiscal sustainability and improving the functioning of labor markets.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This paper discusses Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Sixth and Seventh Reviews Under the Stand-By Arrangement and Requests for Augmentation of Access and Modification of Performance Criteria (PC). Program performance became more uneven in late 2013 and early 2014, reflecting both economic factors and delays in policy implementation. Fiscal policies were broadly on track, but two end-December 2013 fiscal PCs were missed. As revenue collection steadily improved, all end-March 2014 PCs were met. Given the authorities’ overall performance and corrective actions, the IMF staff recommends the completion of the sixth and seventh reviews.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
The economy of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which is strongly connected to Europe through trade and financial channels, continues to pay a high price for the tough conditions in the area. The paper discuss that, following low demand in its trading partners, exports slumped in 2012 by 7.5 percent, dragging the economy to an export-led recession that resulted in a contraction of economic activity by 0.7 percent. The share of government spending in GDP fell by almost a percentage point, offsetting completely the automatic stabilizers.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
On January 31, 2014, the Executive Board of the IMF completed the fifth review of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s economic performance under a program supported by a 24-month Stand-By Arrangement. The completion of the review enables the disbursement of an amount equivalent to SDR 42.275 million (about €48 million), which will bring total disbursements under the arrangement to SDR 253.65 million (about €287.9 million). All end-September 2013 performance criteria (PCs) and indicative targets were met. The Executive Board approved waivers of applicability of the now-controlling end-December 2013 PCs on the budget balances and accumulation of domestic arrears for the Institutions of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the entity central governments, for which data are not yet available and for which there is no evidence that they were not observed.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
Bosnia and Herzegovina’s (BiH) challenge is to cope with the adverse economic environment and prepare the ground for achieving sustainable export-led economic growth, raising living standards, and making progress toward EU accession. In addition to fiscal consolidation, this will require reforms to improve the composition of public expenditure and unlock the economy’s potential. Financial sector policies should aim at further enhancing the authorities’ crisis preparedness and contingency planning. These policies would also provide a solid basis for the stability of the currency board and enhanced national policy coordination.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This paper discusses Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Third Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement and Request for Waiver of Applicability of a Performance Criterion. Financial sector indicators through end-March 2013 suggest that the banking system remains profitable and adequately capitalized at the aggregate level. Foreign parent banks’ exposure to their Bongani Investments Holdings subsidiaries has broadly stabilized over the last several quarters. Industrial production and exports rose markedly in the first quarter of 2013 compared to the same period last year. It is found that while this reflected to a large extent a much milder winter, higher water levels that boosted electricity production, and exports, prospects for a modest economic recovery this year of approximately ½ percent have improved.
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF)’s Statistics Department (STA) conducted a technical assistance (TA) mission to the Central Bank of Montenegro (CBM) for the compilation of external sector statistics (ESS) during April 28–May 13, 2021. The mission was funded by Eurostat to meet the European Union (EU)’s acquis1 from the ESS perspective. The mission focused on the compilation of quarterly international investment position (IIP),2 and assisted the CBM in preparing the Reserves Data Template (RDT) as well as in recording of financial intermediary services indirectly measured (FISIM) in balance of payments statistics.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

5.1 This chapter discusses the classifications of financial assets and liabilities used in the international accounts. These classifications are applied to positions, the associated income and financial account transactions, and other changes involving financial assets and liabilities. Classifications are used to group similar components and to separate components with different characteristics. The international accounts functional categories and their relationship to the instruments classification are discussed in Chapter 6.