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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
The pandemic hit the Chilean economy while it was recovering from the 2019 social unrest. The authorities’ swift and strong economic policy efforts and Chile’s very strong institutional frameworks helped buffer the economic and social consequences. The ongoing economic recovery continues to be supported by ample policy stimulus, a rapid vaccination process, well-anchored inflation expectations, a resilient export base, and continued market confidence.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
Colombia’s recovery is gaining momentum on the back of strong domestic demand, with a wider current account deficit. As a key external shock, migration flows from Venezuela accelerated in 2018 and by end-December 1.5 million migrants were estimated to live in Colombia. Risks to global growth and financial stability are tilted to the downside and have increased somewhat relative to the last FCL approval according to the April 2019 WEO and GFSR. Given the importance of oil exports and non-resident holdings of local-currency bonds, Colombia remains exposed to lower global growth, including indirectly through lower oil prices, and a sudden reversal in investor sentiment. Colombia weathered last year’s financial and oil market volatility well, however, as evidenced by stable spreads and local currency bond yields.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
Mexico has recovered more gradually from the pandemic than its peers and economic activity is expected to slow in the second half of this year and into 2023. Inflation increased as the economy emerged from the COVID-19 shock but is expected to plateau in the second half of 2022 and then gradually decline.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
COVID-19 has taken a severe toll on Colombia’s society and economy—including over 60,000 deaths and over 5 million jobs temporarily lost in Colombia’s largest recession on record. A gradual but uneven recovery led by private domestic demand and manufacturing is underway, but services continue to be weak. While the economy had remained resilient before the pandemic owing to very strong policy frameworks, economic activity is not expected to return to pre-pandemic levels until the end of 2022.
International Monetary Fund
The Flexible Credit Line (FCL) was introduced as part of a package of reforms to the Fund’s lending facilities in March 2009 and its design was further refined in August 2010. The following provides operational guidance and further background information on the FCL. SPR (the Emerging Markets Division), FIN, and LEG stand ready to clarify any further questions departments may have on the FCL or other aspects of the reforms to lending and conditionality.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Review Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) Arrangement for Poland. The authorities have taken measures to mitigate the economic slowdown and maintain macroeconomic stability. With subdued inflation, monetary policy has been accommodative during the first half of 2009. Measures have also been taken to safeguard financial stability. The IMF staff’s assessment is that Poland continues to meet the qualification criteria for access to FCL resources and remains committed to responding appropriately to actual or potential balance of payments pressures.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
On January 8, 2014, the Executive Board of the IMF completed its review of Poland’s qualification for the arrangement under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) and reaffirmed Poland’s continued qualification to access FCL resources. The Polish authorities have indicated that they intend to continue treating the arrangement as precautionary. The IMF has supported the authorities’ policies with four successive FCL arrangements. The current two-year FCL arrangement for Poland was approved by the IMF’s Executive Board on January 18, 2013, in an amount of SDR 22 billion (about US$33.7 billion). Poland’s first FCL arrangement was approved May 6, 2009, for SDR 13.69 billion (about US$21 billion). Successor arrangements were approved in July 2010 and in January 2011.
International Monetary Fund
The Flexible Credit Line (FCL) was introduced as part of a package of reforms to the Fund’s lending facilities in March 2009 and its design was further refined in August 2010 and in the 2014 Review of the policy. The following provides operational guidance and further background information on the FCL. SPR (the Emerging Markets Division), FIN, and LEG stand ready to clarify any further questions departments may have on the FCL or other aspects of the reforms to lending and conditionality.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
The Covid-19 shock this year has imposed an enormous strain on Mexico. Beside the staggering human cost, the economy faces a historic drop in output and employment and a sharp spike in poverty. It is expected to take many years for employment, income, and poverty to return to pre-pandemic levels.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Mexico’s Review Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) Arrangement. Mexico has navigated successfully a complex external environment, characterized by falling commodity prices, a sharp appreciation of the U.S. dollar, and heightened volatility in international financial markets. The economy continues to grow at a moderate rate and inflation is close to the target. Looking ahead, activity should be supported by strengthening external demand and by the implementation of the structural reforms. The IMF staff’s assessment is that Mexico continues to meet the qualification criteria for access to FCL resources