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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

country’s external position. Access to the Fund’s FCL will continue to play a significant role in supporting the authorities’ policies in the presence of these downside risks. A successor FCL arrangement, which the authorities intend to continue to treat as precautionary, will provide policy flexibility and serve as a temporary insurance that reinforces market confidence. The authorities intend to phase out the use of the FCL facility as global risks affecting Colombia decrease substantially.” Background: Colombia’s first FCL arrangement was approved on May 11

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Colombia’s Arrangement Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) and Cancellation of the Current Arrangement. In the baseline scenario, growth in Colombia is expected to decelerate to 3.4 percent in 2015 but gradually return toward potential over the medium term and inflation to remain at the midpoint of the central bank’s 2–4 percent target range. The authorities are requesting a successor two-year FCL arrangement for 500 percent of quota, and cancellation of the current arrangement which expires on June 23, 2015. The IMF staff assesses that Colombia meets the qualification criteria for access to IMF resources under the FCL arrangement, and recommends its approval by the Executive Board.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses Colombia’s Request for an Arrangement Under the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) and Cancellation of the Current Arrangement. Colombia has very strong policy frameworks—anchored by a flexible exchange rate, a credible inflation targeting-regime, effective financial sector supervision and regulation, and a structural fiscal rule—that have served as a basis for the economy’s resilience prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. During this time, Colombia has made remarkable efforts to integrate a substantial number of migrants from Venezuela that boosted domestic demand but widened external vulnerabilities. The new arrangement under the FCL is expected to help Colombia manage heightened external risks, protect ongoing efforts to effectively respond to the pandemic, integrate migrants, foster inclusive growth, and reduce external vulnerabilities. Despite higher external vulnerabilities, risks, and stress, the new arrangement can be maintained at the same access level because the authorities have built higher external buffers by accumulating significant additional reserves since the 2018 FCL request. The arrangement should boost market confidence, and combined with the comfortable level of international reserves, provide insurance against downside risks.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
Over the last quarter of a century, Peru has become one of the most dynamic economies in Latin America. During this period, Peru built very strong policy and institutional frameworks and economic fundamentals while maintaining external, financial, and fiscal stability. The strength of the Peruvian economy was tested with the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, when the economy collapsed, leading to a significant deterioration of the fiscal accounts. Subsequently, the economy recovered strongly in 2021, and the fiscal position strengthened considerably, while inflationary pressures emerged (in line with global trends). However, Peru is bearing a very high humanitarian and economic cost from the COVID-19 pandemic, sizable under-employment, and a large increase in poverty. These challenges and recent social unrest related to high energy and food prices point to the need to accelerate structural reforms to foster high and inclusive growth. While political uncertainty has risen, with frequent cabinet reshufflings, the authorities remain committed to maintaining their very strong policy frameworks and prudent macroeconomic policies.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

facility will be useful in case of stress in the Treasuries market and it highlights the efforts of my authorities to broaden the set of external buffers instead of relying solely on the FCL. Going forward, considering the soundness of the macroeconomic policy framework, the Colombian authorities recognize the temporary nature of the FCL facility and they are open to the possibility of reducing access at the mid-term review, as part of a gradual exit strategy, conditional on external risks receding and as the current situation in the global economy improves. On

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background: Colombia’s strong economic policy framework, comprising an inflation- targeting regime, a flexible exchange rate, effective financial sector supervision and regulation, and a fiscal policy guided by a structural balance rule, has underpinned strong economic performance in recent years. These policies and institutions also help smooth the large terms of trade shock the country is facing, allowing a gradual adjustment to a new equilibrium. Outlook: In the baseline scenario, growth is expected to decelerate to 3.4 percent in 2015 but gradually return toward potential (4¼ percent) over the medium term and inflation to remain at the midpoint of the central bank’s 2–4 percent target range. The current account deficit would gradually narrow in line with the expected mild rebound in oil prices and the sustained growth in Colombia’s trading partners, while net private capital inflows would remain strong. The authorities are firmly committed to maintaining their sound policy framework and strengthening policy buffers in the period covered by the proposed arrangement. Risks: Risks associated with emerging markets have increased since the 2014 Article IV consultation. Despite strong fundamentals, Colombia is facing a permanent adjustment to weaker external conditions while being vulnerable to tail risks, especially a surge in financial volatility, protracted growth slowdown in trading partners, and a further decline in oil prices. Flexible Credit Line (FCL): The authorities are requesting a successor two-year FCL arrangement for 500 percent of quota (SDR 3.87 billion), which they intend to treat as precautionary, and cancellation of the current arrangement which expires on June 23, 2015. The access requested would provide Colombia with reasonable cover in an adverse external scenario. The authorities consider access to the FCL to be temporary and have signaled their intention to phase out its use as external risks recede. Staff assesses that Colombia meets the qualification criteria for access to Fund resources under the FCL arrangement, and recommends its approval by the Executive Board. Fund liquidity: The proposed commitment of SDR 3.87 billion would have only a marginal impact on the Fund’s liquidity position. Process: An informal meeting to consult with the Executive Board on a possible FCL arrangement for Colombia was held on May 22, 2015.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Background: Colombia’s strong economic policy framework, comprising an inflation- targeting regime, a flexible exchange rate, effective financial sector supervision and regulation, and a fiscal policy guided by a structural balance rule, has underpinned strong economic performance in recent years. These policies and institutions also help smooth the large terms of trade shock the country is facing, allowing a gradual adjustment to a new equilibrium. Outlook: In the baseline scenario, growth is expected to decelerate to 3.4 percent in 2015 but gradually return toward potential (4¼ percent) over the medium term and inflation to remain at the midpoint of the central bank’s 2–4 percent target range. The current account deficit would gradually narrow in line with the expected mild rebound in oil prices and the sustained growth in Colombia’s trading partners, while net private capital inflows would remain strong. The authorities are firmly committed to maintaining their sound policy framework and strengthening policy buffers in the period covered by the proposed arrangement. Risks: Risks associated with emerging markets have increased since the 2014 Article IV consultation. Despite strong fundamentals, Colombia is facing a permanent adjustment to weaker external conditions while being vulnerable to tail risks, especially a surge in financial volatility, protracted growth slowdown in trading partners, and a further decline in oil prices. Flexible Credit Line (FCL): The authorities are requesting a successor two-year FCL arrangement for 500 percent of quota (SDR 3.87 billion), which they intend to treat as precautionary, and cancellation of the current arrangement which expires on June 23, 2015. The access requested would provide Colombia with reasonable cover in an adverse external scenario. The authorities consider access to the FCL to be temporary and have signaled their intention to phase out its use as external risks recede. Staff assesses that Colombia meets the qualification criteria for access to Fund resources under the FCL arrangement, and recommends its approval by the Executive Board. Fund liquidity: The proposed commitment of SDR 3.87 billion would have only a marginal impact on the Fund’s liquidity position. Process: An informal meeting to consult with the Executive Board on a possible FCL arrangement for Colombia was held on May 22, 2015.