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Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan
This departmental paper marks the 10th anniversary of the IMF Financial Access Survey (FAS). It offers a retrospective of the FAS database, along with some reflections as to its future directions. Since its 2009 launch, the FAS has provided granular data on access to and use of financial services. It is a supply-side database with annual global coverage based on data sourced directly from financial service providers—aimed at supporting policymakers to target and evaluate financial inclusion policies. Its data collection has kept pace with financial innovation, such as the rise of mobile money and growing demand for gender-disaggregated data—and the FAS must continue to evolve.
Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) This chapter describes stylized facts about financial access for women and SMEs, through the FAS prism—highlighting the need for data granularity . Women’s Financial Inclusion Financial inclusion of women is key for boosting inclusive economic growth and reducing income inequality. Inclusive financial systems can also increase the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policies by broadening financial markets and the tax base ( Čihák and Sahay 2018 ). Most countries for which FAS gender disaggregated data are available have made

Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan
Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan
International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, & Review Department

existing gender workstreams with a view to improving them (e.g., the FAS gender-disaggregated data collection and STA’s regional workshop on financial access data collection which includes gender components). The Tenth Review of the IMF Data Standards Initiatives encourages Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) and SDDS-plus countries—about 80 members—to publish data on labor force participation rates by gender on the IMF Data Standards Bulletin Board (a one-stop shop for all official data under the IMF Data Standards Initiatives). 71. The governance and

International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, & Review Department
On July 22, 2022, the Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) approved the IMF’s first Strategy toward Mainstreaming Gender into the IMF’s core activities. Mainstreaming gender at the IMF starts with the recognition that reducing gender disparities goes hand-in-hand with higher economic growth, greater economic stability and resilience, and lower income inequality. At the same time, economic and financial policies can exacerbate or narrow gender disparities. Well-designed macroeconomic, structural, and financial policies can support efficient and inclusive outcomes and equitably benefit women, girls, and the society in general. The strategy lays out how the IMF can help its member countries address gender disparities in the context of carrying out its core functions—surveillance, lending, and capacity development. The strategy comprises four key pillars: first, gender-disaggregated data collection and development of modeling tools to enable staff to conduct policy analysis; second, a robust governance framework for an evenhanded approach across members based on the macro-criticality of gender; third, strengthening collaboration with external partners to benefit from knowledge sharing and peer learning, leverage complementarities, and maximize the impact on the ground; and fourth, the efficient use of resources allocated to gender by putting in place a central unit for realizing scale economies and supporting country teams.