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Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

and Latin America while mobile money has changed the way people access finance in Africa and other parts of the world. This paper illustrates the value of FAS data granularity in better understanding financial access. It shows that deposit takers other than commercial banks (e.g., microfinance institutions or savings banks) play an important role in providing financial services in some economies although commercial banks are the main player in many economies. FAS data also suggest that in many economies, financial access and use gaps persist in some segments of

Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan
This departmental paper marks the 10th anniversary of the IMF Financial Access Survey (FAS). It offers a retrospective of the FAS database, along with some reflections as to its future directions. Since its 2009 launch, the FAS has provided granular data on access to and use of financial services. It is a supply-side database with annual global coverage based on data sourced directly from financial service providers—aimed at supporting policymakers to target and evaluate financial inclusion policies. Its data collection has kept pace with financial innovation, such as the rise of mobile money and growing demand for gender-disaggregated data—and the FAS must continue to evolve.
Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

report both types of microfinance institutions to the FAS. 1 Reports summarizing the issues discussed during the workshop can be found on the IMF FAS data portal.

Marco A Espinosa-Vega, Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova, Miss Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, and Ms. Yingjie Fan

central banks and financial regulators. The FAS was launched in 2009 at the IMF–World Bank Annual Meetings in Istanbul to meet the demand for data on financial inclusion to support evidence-based policymaking. The FAS has evolved over time to keep pace with changing data needs and the financial sector landscape. This 10th anniversary of the FAS presents an opportunity to take stock of its achievements to date and to reflect on the next generation of the FAS database. The annual frequency and granularity of the FAS data allow for tracking the latest trends of

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

other depository corporations. For the Financial Access Survey (FAS), data was reported through 2017forsome key series and indicators including the two indicators (commercial bank branches per 100,000 adults and ATMs per 100,000 adults) adopted by the UN to monitor Target 8.1 Oof the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Financial Soundness Indicators : Banks have submitted quarterly financial statements, including balance sheets and profit and loss statements, to the Financial Institutions Commission (FIC) since 2009. The FIC publishes financial soundness

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

, they are not published or reported to the Fund. The Financial Soundness Indicators (FSIs) are also not compiled or reported to the STA. For the Financial Access Survey (FAS), data is reported for some key series and indicators including the two indicators (commercial bank branches per 100,000 adults and ATMs per 100,000 adults) adopted by the UN to monitor Target 8.10 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). External Sector Statistics : The EPPSO has made important progress in the improvement of Marshall Islands’ ESS during the JSA ESS Project ended in 2016

International Monetary Fund. European Dept.

Financial Corporations (OFC) sector holds around 15 percent of total financial system assets in the CEMAC region, it is important to begin compilation of MFS for the insurance sector, which is the largest subsector of the OFCs. Collaboration between BEAC and the regional supervisory entity for insurance corporations (CIMA) is key for the expansion of MFS coverage to include insurance corporations. Congo’s Financial Access Survey (FAS) data is outdated (last reported in 2017). Financial sector surveillance : Republic of Congo provides all core and eight encouraged

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

: http://0-www-imf-org.library.svsu.edu/en/~/media/BA1EEFCA3BAD47F291BBFDFA8D99F05D.ashx . 2 The FAS data are available at: http://0-data-imf-org.library.svsu.edu/?sk=E5DCAB7E-A5CA-4892-A6EA-598B5463A34C . 3 Data Quality Assessment Framework (DQAF) and the IMF’s new results-based project management system (RBM).

Ms. Kazuko Shirono, Esha Chhabra, Ms. Bidisha Das, Ms. Yingjie Fan, and Mr. Hector Carcel Villanova

. The FAS data also suggest that mobile money usage measured by transaction values and volumes has increased significantly in many economies over the past years. Mobile money services are also starting to expand to include new and enhanced products such as credit and interest-bearing savings in some countries. Transaction-level data analysis of mobile money accounts in Kenya confirms this trend and reveals the degree of penetration of these new services among mobile money users included in the study. The methodological guidance provided by the MFSMCG on the