Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 59 items for :

  • "EU banana regime" x
Clear All
Mr. Paul Cashin, Mr. Montfort Mlachila, and Cleary Haines

the then European Community and ACP countries, which commenced in 1975 and expired in 2000). The European Union’s preferential regime for bananas has undergone significant change over the last fifteen years. Along with the implementation of the EU Single Market in 1993 there came a common policy and marketing structure for banana imports. Under the so-called EU Banana Regime, preferential arrangements for ACP bananas were extended under a new import regime that encompassed the entire European Community (Dickson, 1993). The EU banana regime operated on the basis

Mr. Paul Cashin, Mr. Montfort Mlachila, and Cleary Haines
This paper examines the macroeconomic effects of the erosion of trade preferences, with a focus on the export of Caribbean bananas to Europe. Estimates are made of the magnitude of implicit assistance provided over a period of three decades to eastern Caribbean countries through banana trade preferences. The value of such assistance rose until the early 1990s, and has declined precipitously since then. Using vector autoregressive analysis, the paper finds that changes in the level of implicit assistance have had a considerable macroeconomic impact, especially on Caribbean real GDP growth.
Mrs. Ruby Randall, Mr. Jorge Shepherd, Mr. Frits Van Beek, Mr. J. R. Rosales, and Ms. Mayra Rebecca Zermeno

their banana production under a revamped EU banana regime. Expenditure restraint, in particular containment of the government wage bill, is key to maintaining the region’s competitiveness and safeguarding the currency arrangement. The latter will also require efforts to improve the flexibility of goods and factor markets, and intensified efforts at trade and capital liberalization. It is encouraging that the Monetary Council has recommended that each country establish a tripartite council on prices, wages, employment, and productivity, in recognition of the need for

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper analyzes the income dispersion and comovement in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union region. It finds that incomes are diverging, with the Leeward Islands converging to a higher income level than the Windward Islands. The paper examines the macroeconomic impact of trade preference erosion on the Windward Islands and demonstrates the substantial impact from preference erosion on growth, trade balances, and fiscal positions. The paper also analyzes the size of the informal economy in the Caribbean.
Mr. Paul Cashin, Mr. Montfort Mlachila, and Cleary Haines
Mrs. Ruby Randall, Mr. Jorge Shepherd, Mr. Frits Van Beek, Mr. J. R. Rosales, and Ms. Mayra Rebecca Zermeno

Abstract

The Eastern Caribbean Central Bank is one of just a few regional central banks in the world and the only one where the member countries have pooled all their foreign reserves, the convertability of the common currency is fully self-supported, and the parity of the exchange rate has not changed. This occasional paper reviews recent developments, policy issues, and institutional arrangements in the member countries of the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union, and looks at the regional financial system, its supervision, and the central bank's initiatives to establish a single financial space. The paper includes a large amount of statistical information that is not readily available elsewhere from a single source.

International Monetary Fund

free market prices for the fruit. With the establishment of the single European market, a common marketing structure came into effect on July 1, 1993. The so-called EU Banana Regime maintained the traditional obligation to the African, Caribbean, and Pacific (ACP) producers by restricting imports from non-ACP suppliers through a tariff/quota system. 6. The preferential banana regime has been challenged both internally in Europe, through the EC Court of Justice, and externally by the GATT bodies, and subsequently, by the WTO. The WTO has contested the legality of

International Monetary Fund

undergone significant change over the last fifteen years . Along with the implementation of the EU Single Market in 1993 there came a common policy and marketing structure for banana imports. Under the so-called EU Banana Regime, preferential arrangements for ACP bananas were extended under a new import regime that encompassed the entire European Community (Dickson, 1993). 29. The EU banana regime operated on the basis of an annual ACP banana quota for duty-free export to the EU, and an annual quota for bananas from Latin America (’dollar’ bananas) subject to a tariff

International Monetary Fund

. Prospects of the Banana Industry post-2005 D. Economic and Social Impact of a Declining Banana Sector E. Conclusion Figure I.1 Banana Production (1980 - 2001) Box I.1 The EU Banana Regime—A Timeline Table I.1 Windward’s Banana Production by Country (1980 - 2001) II. Legislation Governing the Offshore Financial Sector Table II.2 Summary of International Concerns and Actions Taken Relative to the Offshore Financial Sector Statistical Appendix—Tables 1. Selected Price and Production Indicators 2. GDP by Type of Expenditure at Current Prices 3. GDP