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Sebastian Horn and Mr. Futoshi Narita
Over the past two decades, many low-income developing countries have substantially increased openness towards external financing and have received large capital inflows. Using bank-level micro data, this paper finds that capital inflows have been associated with financial deepening through increases in bank loans, deposits, and wholesale funding. Domestic banks increase loans more than foreign banks. There are only modest signs of a build-up in financial vulnerabilities. Causality is examined through an instrumental variable approach and an augmented inverse-probability weighting estimator. These approaches indicate only limited evidence for global push effects, pointing towards the importance of domestic pull factors.
Sebastian Horn and Mr. Futoshi Narita

macroeconomic policy in low-income countries supported by the U.K.’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). The views expressed herein are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the IMF, its Executive Board, its management, or the FCDO. Abstract Over the past two decades, many low-income developing countries have substantially increased openness towards external financing and have received large capital inflows. Using bank-level micro data, this paper finds that capital inflows have been associated with financial deepening through increases in

Mr. Giovanni Melina and Marika Santoro

adaptation under worsened climate conditions D. Trade-offs for international donors V. Conclusions 1 This paper is part of a research project on macroeconomic policy in developing countries supported by the U.K’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO).We are grateful to Eugenio Cerutti for very useful comments and suggestions. All remaining errors are ours.

Mr. Ross Levine

Almekinders, Tara Iyer, Marina Conesa Martinez, Jan Moeller, and Futoshi Narita. I especially thank Roland Kpodar, who provided intellectual guidance throughout this project. This research is part of the IMF-FCDO project on Macroeconomic Research in Low-Income Countries (Project id: 60925) supported by the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). The views expressed in this paper are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) or FCDO.

Rasmané Ouedraogo and Nicolas Syrichas

educational mobility C. Determinants of occupational mobility VI. Concluding Remarks References 1 ‘The authors would like to thank Allard Celine, Roland Kangni Kpodar, Clara Mina, Monique Newiak, Martha Woldemichael, John Spray, Zhiyong An, Alex Ludwig, Leo Kaas and all participants to AFR Department Seminar and Goethe University Frankfurt. This research is part of a Macroeconomic Research in Low-Income Countries project (Project id: 60925) supported by the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). The views expressed in this paper are

Thorsten Beck, Mathilde Janfils, and Mr. Kangni R Kpodar

TABLES 1. Summary statistics for regression sample 2. Correlation table Variables, Definitions and Sources * Beck: European University Institute and CEPR; Janfils: Wise; Kpodar: International Monetary Fund and FERDI. The authors would like to thank Sophia Chen, Patrick Imam, Asad Qureshi, Tito da Silva Filho and Yorbol Yakhshilikov for their insightful comments and suggestions. This research is part of the Macroeconomic Research in Low-Income Countries project (Project ID: 60925) supported by the UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office