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Venkat Josyula

so-called “clean” price (i.e., excluding interest accrued but not yet due). Wherever possible, data on debt securities, reported on a clean price basis, should be converted to a dirty price basis. This may not always be possible, especially for economies that use an aggregate approach for data collection. Compilers are asked to provide methodological notes setting out the basis of reporting, together with the methods used, if any, to adjust the data to a dirty price basis (see Appendix 3 , CPIS metadata questionnaire, question 4.9). 3.38 Respondents may record

Venkat Josyula

Abstract

Organizing a portfolio investment survey requires informed choices by data compilers on the relative merits and demerits of a collection system. To ensure both consistency and quality of reporting across the participating economies in the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey, this chapter covers certain practical issues that go beyond those covered in the International Monetary Fund’s BPM6 Compilation Guide.

Venkat Josyula

Abstract

This chapter summarizes various economies’ experience in conducting the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey (CPIS). This information could be useful particularly for economies preparing to participate in the CPIS for the first time, or for those wishing to extend or improve the scope of their present CPIS reporting. The experience of economies on the following practical issues are addressed: (i) coverage (choice of collection method and limitations in approaches to coverage), (ii) separating direct investment from portfolio investment, (iii) market price valuation, (iv) treatment of accrued interest, (v) treatment of collective investment schemes, (vi) direct holdings abroad, (vii) quality control, and (viii) steps taken to address low coverage or low response rates. In addition, given the growing importance of data collected for the CPIS encouraged categories, the experience of some countries in implementing the CPIS for these data elements is presented.

Venkat Josyula

Abstract

This Guide has been prepared to assist economies that participate or are preparing to participate in the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey (CPIS). For economies already participating in the CPIS, the Guide provides statistical guidelines that compilers may find useful for improving the quality of the data and for compiling additional items that were introduced in the aftermath of the 2007–2008 financial crisis. Additionally, this third edition updates the second edition of the CPIS Guide (2002) to reflect the adoption of the sixth edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual (BPM6) as the standard framework for compiling cross-border position statistics and to provide compilation guidance drawing on International Monetary Fund (IMF) staff and IMF members’ experience. This chapter covers the purpose and background of the CPIS and provides an overview of how the Guide is organized.

Venkat Josyula

Abstract

This chapter describes the preparatory steps and provides practical advice to compilers for conducting a portfolio investment survey for the first time. The chapter covers: (i) timetable; (ii) legal and confidentiality considerations; (iii) compiling, maintaining, and using a register of respondents; (iv) choosing and developing a computer package to process the survey results; and (v) quality control.

Venkat Josyula

Abstract

This chapter sets out the scope and modalities of the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey (CPIS), Securities Held as Foreign Exchange Reserves (SEFER), and Securities Held by International Organizations (SSIO).

Venkat Josyula

Abstract

This third edition of the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey Guide has been prepared to assist economies that participate or are preparing to participate in the Coordinated Portfolio Investment Survey (CPIS). It builds on and updates the second edition of the CPIS Guide (2002) to reflect the adoption of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual, sixth edition (BPM6) as the standard framework for compiling cross-border position statistics.

International Monetary Fund

-border holdings of securities). A full description of compilation techniques used by all CPIS participants, including SEIFiCs, will be placed on the IMF external website later in the year. This will take the form of responses to a CPIS metadata questionnaire, the results of which are now being reviewed. 32 Two exceptions are the Cayman Islands and Netherlands Antilles, for which cross-border liabilities in Table 12 are larger than cross-border assets. For the Cayman Islands, this outcome is likely to be due to major gaps in the coverage of the 2001 CPIS resulting from the