Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 139 items for :

  • "CIS trade" x
Clear All
Ms. Victoria J Perry, Ms. Katherine Baer, and Mr. Emil M Sunley
In all of the new countries formed after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, other than the Baltics, the value-added taxes (VATs) adopted were “hybrid” VATs that treat CIS trade differently from trade with the rest of the world. This paper inquires whether this is appropriate. The paper concludes that it would be better if all CIS countries applied the destination principle to CIS trade as well as to trade with the rest of the world. The paper addresses the economic, administrative and revenue allocation considerations underlying this decision.
Ms. Victoria J Perry, Ms. Katherine Baer, and Mr. Emil M Sunley

I. Introduction Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the new countries adopted value-added taxes (VATs) of general application. In part because the former Soviet Union was viewed as a common economic space, the new countries, other than the Baltic countries, (a group of countries hereinafter referred to as the “CIS countries”) adopted “hybrid” VATs that treat CIS trade differently from non-CIS trade. In general, CIS trade is taxed according to the origin principle, under which goods are taxed in the country in which they are produced. Under this

Ms. Katrin Elborgh-Woytek

Front Matter Page European II Department Authorized for distribution by John Odling-Smee Contents I. Introduction II. Developments in Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Trade During Transition III. Openness and Distance in CIS Trade IV. Reasons for Lower-Than-Expected Trade V. Summary and Conclusions References Tables 1. CIS: Total Exports, 1993–2002 2. CIS: Total Imports, 1993–2002 3. CIS: Commodity Concentration of Exports 4. CIS: Geographic Concentration of Exports, 1995 and 2001 5. Determinants of Openness for the

Mr. Marco Pani, Mr. Etibar Jafarov, and Mr. Clinton R. Shiells

(2002) consider various possible explanations for the pickup in Ukraine’s economic growth following several years of decline, such as increased utilization of the capital stock inherited from the Soviet period. Elborgh-Woytek (2003) documents the shift in trade by the CIS countries away from intra-CIS trade and toward the rest of the world, including notably the EU, and compares actual with potential trade. III. D ata Annual data for real GDP growth, CPI inflation, and government expenditures as a percentage of GDP were obtained from the IMF World Economic

Ms. Katrin Elborgh-Woytek

shortages; real sector integration was severely disrupted; declining incomes resulted in a demand shock; and the opening up to high-quality imports from developed market economies implied a supply shock. Political instability, including trade blockades, further inhibited trade. This paper analyzes the developments in CIS trade patterns over the transition decade, following the initial decline. Section II describes the overall quantitative trends in CIS trade, the geographic reorientation of trade flows, and the commodity structure of CIS trade. In Section III , I

Ms. Katrin Elborgh-Woytek
This paper analyzes developments in the structure of trade in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) during the transition decade, and finds that it changed less than in other transition economies. Trade openness of the CIS increased between 1993 and 1997, but has fallen to a lower-level plateau since then owing to regional and country-specific factors. These include slower progress in transition, geographic aspects, restrictions on trade, governance and corruption problems, weak infrastructure, lack of regional cooperation, and political conflicts. Regression results show that trade openness of the CIS countries would likely increase substantially if market-oriented reforms were pursued more vigorously.