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International Monetary Fund

of the risks they pose. Equally important, the statements of guidance issued by CIMA should be reviewed in order to provide more specific guidance on the risks and appropriate mitigation measures germane to the banking sector of the Cayman Islands. 6 In these ways, the risk assessment should affect all areas of the CIMA bank supervisory approach. 12. Where CIMA relies on other supervisors and regimes, it needs to ensure that all risks are adequately addressed . In supervising over 200 banks with no physical presence, CIMA inevitably has to rely on the regimes

International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses findings of the assessment of Financial Sector Supervision and Regulation on the Cayman Islands. The assessment reveals that substantial progress has been made in the implementation of the 2003 Offshore Financial Center assessment recommendations, including, importantly, regarding Cayman Islands Monetary Authority’s independence and resources. There is scope for enhancing regulatory reporting and disclosure requirements by financial entities, such as shortening the period for filing required documents and requiring all insurers to disclose their use of derivatives and similar commitments regularly.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews key findings of the detailed assessment of the Observance of Standards and Codes in the Financial Sector of the Cayman Islands. Banks in the Cayman Islands operate within a well-defined prudential regulatory framework, generally in accordance with Basel standards, that is, largely modeled after the framework currently in use in the United Kingdom. The two-tiered required minimum risk capital standards are significantly above those required by the Basel Capital Accord and are applied in practice based primarily on the perceived differences in risk related to bank ownership.
International Monetary Fund

This paper reviews key findings of the detailed assessment of the Observance of Standards and Codes in the Financial Sector of the Cayman Islands. Banks in the Cayman Islands operate within a well-defined prudential regulatory framework, generally in accordance with Basel standards, that is, largely modeled after the framework currently in use in the United Kingdom. The two-tiered required minimum risk capital standards are significantly above those required by the Basel Capital Accord and are applied in practice based primarily on the perceived differences in risk related to bank ownership.