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Miss Rita Mesias

The purpose of this chapter is to assist compilers in improving the quality of direct investment data by using some recommended self-assessment tools for compiling and reporting data, by assessing consistency between International Investment Position (IIP) and CDIS data, and by assessing data reported by counterpart economies (mirror data). CDIS Self-Assessment Tools 6.1 Before reporting CDIS data to the IMF, compilers are encouraged to perform the following recommended steps: Confirm with survey respondents significant increases or decreases in

Miss Rita Mesias

Abstract

This Coordinated Direct Investment Survey Guide (Guide) has been prepared to assist economies in participating in the Coordinated Direct Investment Survey (CDIS). The CDIS is being conducted under the auspices of the Statistics Department of the IMF across a wide range of economies. The survey is conducted simultaneously by all participating economies; uses consistent definitions; and encourages best practices in collecting, compiling, and disseminating data on direct investment positions. The CDIS is thus an important tool in capturing world totals and the geographic distribution of direct investment positions, thereby contributing to important new understandings of the extent of globalization, and improving the overall quality of direct investment data worldwide. As of the writing of this updated Guide, more than 100 economies participate in the CDIS.

Emma Angulo and Alicia Hierro

. Criteria for Identifying Entities in a Direct Investment Relationship VI. Addressing Bilateral Asymmetries A. Compliance with Recommended Guidelines for Recording CDIS Data B. Reducing the Reporting of Confidential and Unallocated Data by Counterpart Economy References Tables 1. Top Ten Differences Inward/Inward Derived 2. Top Ten Differences Outward/Outward Derived 3. Twenty Smallest Bilateral Asymmetries as of End-2015 4. Twenty Largest Bilateral Asymmetries as of End-2015 5A. Bilateral Asymmetries from Total Direct Investment as of end-2015

Miss Rita Mesias

represents a firm commitment to improve data on direct investment positions and to undertake a comprehensive survey or a census, by both those economies that currently produce such estimates as well as by economies that have yet to do so. The results of the CDIS (data and metadata) 3 are to be reported to the IMF, which publishes nonconfidential information on its website (see http://0-data-imf-org.library.svsu.edu/CDIS ). 4 Background 1.4 From its early beginnings, the IMF has used aggregate balance of payments data in its surveillance work and economic analyses. In the past

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

recipient, World Bank staff, other technical assistance providers and donors with legitimate interest, shall require the explicit consent of the TA recipient and the IMF's Statistics Department. Contents Glossary SUMMARY OF MISSION OUTCOMES AND PRIORITY RECOMMENDATIONS DETAILED TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND RECOMMENDATIONS A. Action Plan B. Improving the Accuracy of Balance of Payments and IIP Statistics C. Exploring New Data Sources and Other Methodological Issues D. Other Issues FIGURES 1. Adjustments to CDIS Data Following the Reconciliation

Miss Rita Mesias

It is important to differentiate between data collection ( Chapters 2 and 3 ) and the compilation and reporting of direct investment data, as each of these steps involves special treatment. 4.1 This chapter provides guidance on the compilation of the data that are collected, on data that should be omitted from direct investment, and on the reporting of direct investment statistics for participation in the IMF’s CDIS. Data Compilation 4.2 As recommended in Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual (BPM6) , direct

Emma Angulo and Alicia Hierro

Department (STA) conducted a project to raise awareness on (and to the extent feasible try to address) large bilateral asymmetries based on the 2015 CDIS release for end-2014 CDIS data, contacting a total of 47 CDIS participants. STA conducted a similar project in 2013 based on the 2012 CDIS release with a more reduced scope (28 CDIS participants). 2 Both exercises provided insights into the reasons for asymmetries. They also helped some economies detect errors and consider taking actions to further improve the quality of their direct investment data. Several economies